Saturday, December 30, 2017

15% off you membership

Great news everybody when you enter this code you will get 15% off you membership.. when you sign up at www.grimworkshop.com
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New years eve safety

Drinking: While this goes under the “common sense” rule, it still must be said, DON’T SIT YOUR DRINK DOWN ANYWHERE! A lot of times people are to trusting within their surrounding and tend to put their drink down where anyone can get to it, keep your drink with you. Even if you have to go to the bathroom, either take it with your or give it to a close friend of yours. Whatever you do, don’t leave your drink at a table and then come back to it. While New Year’s Eve is super fun it’s also super dangerous when it comes to someone spiking your drink while it’s unattended. When you are popping champagne bottles, aim the cork away from people. This may sound funny, however; it’s a serious issue, it’s all fun and games until someone loses an eye!
Driving: Whatever you do this New Year’s Eve, DON’T DRINK AND DRIVE! Even if you’ve had only a couple of drinks, have a designated driver to drive you around. You many think that you’re not that “buzzed up”, however you’re wrong! To avoid problems with accidents and the law, have someone “sober” drive for you. This doesn’t count if your designated driver had drinks along with you; make sure your driver is alcohol free for the night.
Public Events: Being that it’s New Year’s Eve I’m sure you’re going to want to attend all of the parties and New Year’s festivities. When attending these events, beware of your surroundings at all times! This is extremely important since you may be drinking around tons of people you don’t know in a place you’ve probably never been. Never go to these types of places by yourself. This doesn’t just go for women it also goes for men! When at public events make sure you have a communication device such as cell phone or laptop just in case anything negative occurs. Be prepared!
No Fireworks or Guns: This will be enforced to the fullest by law enforcement when it comes to New Year’s Eve festivities. If you are going to engage in fireworks, leave it up to the professionals. If you are caught with fireworks this New Year’s Eve, it may be more than just a fine; it may possibly lead to jail time!
Friends: If you plan on going anywhere for the New Year’s Eve holiday, take friends with you! When going to any type of party or function, don’t go alone! This is really important when it comes to females going out, always stay in groups!
Pet Safety: Nothing frightens pet’s more than sudden loud noises. Extra attention must be given so your pets won’t run away in a panic. Scared, running pets can be hit by cars, cause accidents, and become lost...not to mention, frequently bite people.

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Other tips for your New Year’s Celebration include:
  • Make sure all fences and gates are secure.
  • Make sure your pet has its ID or dog license, come down and microchip NOW, if you already have a microchip make sure it is current.
  • Ask your veterinarian for tranquilizers if your animal has shown signs of extreme uneasiness in the past.
  • Keep your pets INSIDE, in a comfortable room, with comforting music playing to drowned out scary noises.

Thursday, December 28, 2017

When the temperatures drop, the space heaters come out

When the temperatures drop, the space heaters come out. Before plugging in or otherwise firing up your supplemental indoor heating, be sure you’re following some important safety practices.
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Home heating fires are a significant cause of injuries. Between 2013-2015, the U.S. Fire Administration reports that:
  • An average of 45,900 home heating fires occurred in the United States each year, with an annual average of approximately 205 deaths, 725 injuries and $506 million in property loss.
  • Heating was the second leading cause of home fires after cooking.
  • Home heating fires peaked in the early evening hours between 5 and 9 p.m. with the highest peak between 6 and 8 p.m.
  • Confined fires — fires confined to chimneys, flues or fuel burners — accounted for 75 percent of home heating fires.
  • Twenty-nine percent of the nonconfined home heating fires — fires that spread past the object of origin — happened because the heat source (like a space heater or fire place) was too close to things that can burn.
The National Fire Protection Association offers these best practices for staying warm and safe while indoors this winter:
  • Keep anything that can burn at least three feet away from heating equipment, like the furnace, fireplace, wood stove, or portable space heater.
  • Have a three-foot “kid-free zone” around open fires and space heaters.
  • Never use your oven to heat your home.
  • Remember to turn portable heaters off when leaving the room or going to bed.
  • Always use the right kind of fuel, specified by the manufacturer, for fuel burning space heaters.
  • Make sure the fireplace has a sturdy screen to stop sparks from flying into the room. Ashes should be cool before putting them in a metal container. Keep the container a safe distance away from your home.
  • Test smoke alarms at least once a month.
Although most of us don’t have fireplaces or wood stoves at our places of business, space heaters in office cubicles or shops are a common source of workplace fires. To ensure your team is staying safe, check out the fire prevention courses from our Summit Training Source library, including:
  • Fire Safety
  • Fire Safety for Construction
  • Fire Protection & Prevention
  • Fire Extinguisher Basics and Maintenance

Wednesday, December 27, 2017

Might find a public-access automated external defibrillator (AED)

Of all the places you might find a public-access automated external defibrillator (AED), perhaps nowhere is it more critical than at a gym. A new study shows that having an AED available at fitness centers makes a significant impact on survival rates.
According to an article from the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation, a study published in the European Heart Journal that looked at data collected over an 18-year period in 252 sports centers in Italy showed that:
“Onsite AED use significantly reduced the time to first shock from 7.3 to 3.3 minutes...Neurologically intact survival was 93% for patients treated with an onsite AED compared to 9% without an AED.”
This reduction in response time is crucial for patient survival in a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) incident. Successful defibrillation is highly dependent on how quickly defibrillation occurs. For each minute in cardiac arrest, the chance of survival goes down by about 10%. After as few as 10 minutes, survival is unlikely.
For those unfamiliar with this lifesaving resource, an AED is a small, portable, com­puterized device that is relatively easy for anyone to operate. It automatically analyzes the heart rhythm, determines if a shock is needed and charges itself to be ready to defibrillate.
Or perhaps you’ve seen these devices in a community fitness center, at a hotel or in a restaurant, and have nervously wondered whether it’s really safe for a bystander to use one in an emergency. It is! AEDs cannot accidentally shock someone, it doesn’t take a medical degree to operate one and that moment of shocking the patient isn’t as frightening as the high-voltage drama you see on television shows. For more information, check out our blog post, Common Misconceptions About AEDs.

programs meet national

You’ll find that our programs meet national CPR, AED and First Aid guidelines. People who should consider training are  concerned parents, healthcare providers, professional EMT rescuers, policemen, firemen and public safety responders. The training programs offered may be taught separately or combined for comprehensive study.
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Tuesday, December 26, 2017

Winter is almost officially here in the U.S. and that means snow-covered roads

Winter is almost officially here in the U.S. and that means snow-covered roads and icy conditions. Today’s blog post looks at common winter driving mistakes your company’s drivers need to avoid.
Weather.com has a list of 14 mistakes all drivers need to avoid, including:
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  • Skipping the routine maintenance. When the temperatures are ready to drop, change your wiper fluid from a 50/50 mixture of wiper fluid and water to all fluid (and carry an extra bottle of fluid in your vehicle). Add Anti-Freeze to Your Radiator and don’t skip your regularly scheduled oil and filter change
  • Not testing your vehicle. Checking your battery, headlights and taillights and replacing windshield wiper blades should be part of your winter prep for personal and company vehicles.
  • Not keep a winter driving kit in your vehicle. Shovels, blankets, flashlights, emergency snacks – they can be lifesavers.
  • Not focusing on your winter driving skills. There’s a good chance your drivers are driving too fast, too Close to Other Cars and may need to brush up on their ice-handling skills.
Big rigs hauling heavy loads require even more winter driving skill. Fueloyal.com offers 15 tips for truckers, including:
  • Don’t get complacent or overly confident
  • Accelerate and brake more slowly
  • Clear your windshield, mirrors and lights
  • Always keep your tanks as full as possible
  • Never drive tired, especially in bad weather



We are an approved American Health and Safety Institute (ASHI) Training Center.

We are an approved American Health and Safety Institute (ASHI) Training Center.

They offer VERY SIMILAR programs that most of our instructors have embraced, especially our clients. The ASHI programs are recognized by OSHA,PEOSH, NJDOH, etc. and are another option when teaching Heartsaver Programs. They are a fully accredited program and are gaining substantial ground in the US especially for CPR and First Aid training. They offer other courses as well, such as: Baby-Sitting, Oxygen Delivery, Advanced First Aid, etc. and can help you expand upon your menu of courses.


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Look whats new for Northeast cpr class

Look whats new for Northeast cpr class


http://www.bcls.lib.nj.us/calendar/cpr-training-northeast-cpr

New years eve safety

Drinking: While this goes under the “common sense” rule, it still must be said, DON’T SIT YOUR DRINK DOWN ANYWHERE! A lot of times people are to trusting within their surrounding and tend to put their drink down where anyone can get to it, keep your drink with you. Even if you have to go to the bathroom, either take it with your or give it to a close friend of yours. Whatever you do, don’t leave your drink at a table and then come back to it. While New Year’s Eve is super fun it’s also super dangerous when it comes to someone spiking your drink while it’s unattended. When you are popping champagne bottles, aim the cork away from people. This may sound funny, however; it’s a serious issue, it’s all fun and games until someone loses an eye!
Driving: Whatever you do this New Year’s Eve, DON’T DRINK AND DRIVE! Even if you’ve had only a couple of drinks, have a designated driver to drive you around. You many think that you’re not that “buzzed up”, however you’re wrong! To avoid problems with accidents and the law, have someone “sober” drive for you. This doesn’t count if your designated driver had drinks along with you; make sure your driver is alcohol free for the night.
Public Events: Being that it’s New Year’s Eve I’m sure you’re going to want to attend all of the parties and New Year’s festivities. When attending these events, beware of your surroundings at all times! This is extremely important since you may be drinking around tons of people you don’t know in a place you’ve probably never been. Never go to these types of places by yourself. This doesn’t just go for women it also goes for men! When at public events make sure you have a communication device such as cell phone or laptop just in case anything negative occurs. Be prepared!
No Fireworks or Guns: This will be enforced to the fullest by law enforcement when it comes to New Year’s Eve festivities. If you are going to engage in fireworks, leave it up to the professionals. If you are caught with fireworks this New Year’s Eve, it may be more than just a fine; it may possibly lead to jail time!
Friends: If you plan on going anywhere for the New Year’s Eve holiday, take friends with you! When going to any type of party or function, don’t go alone! This is really important when it comes to females going out, always stay in groups!
Pet Safety: Nothing frightens pet’s more than sudden loud noises. Extra attention must be given so your pets won’t run away in a panic. Scared, running pets can be hit by cars, cause accidents, and become lost...not to mention, frequently bite people.
Other tips for your New Year’s Celebration include:
  • Make sure all fences and gates are secure.
  • Make sure your pet has its ID or dog license, come down and microchip NOW, if you already have a microchip make sure it is current.
  • Ask your veterinarian for tranquilizers if your animal has shown signs of extreme uneasiness in the past.
  • Keep your pets INSIDE, in a comfortable room, with comforting music playing to drowned out scary noises.

Sunday, December 24, 2017

Happy holiday

We at Northeast CPR Class  would like to wish everybody a Merry Christmas  ..
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Saturday, December 23, 2017

if you need last minute CPR training

Northeast CPR class is hold a BLS CPR class this coming Thursday 12-28-17 if you need last minute CPR training please email us @ info@northeastcprclass.com

Thursday, December 21, 2017

What You Need to Walk Your Dog in Winter Weather

Winter weather can make it difficult to get your dog out for walks, particularly if you live in a part of the country where ice, snow and freezing winds are the norm. Regardless of the weather, your dog’s exercise requirement stays constant throughout the year, and a lack of wintertime exercise can have a negative impact on your dog's behavior.
When a dog’s exercise needs aren’t met, he finds other ways to release energy, including hyperactive behavior and chewing. Such bad behavior can continue when spring rolls around and outside play is once again an option; for example, a dog who has been isolated during the winter may begin barking at other canines or people on the street. Lack of exercise is also associated with pudgy pooches and the health risks that go along with excess weight.
Just because it’s cold doesn’t mean you need to skip your dog’s walking routine, although shortening the walk can be a wise choice in severe weather. As a Pug parent, shelter volunteer and trainer, I’ve found ways to make wintertime walking bearable, even in the freezing cold of Idaho. Here are some of my favorite tips for walking dogs in the winter.

Walking Equipment for People

By wearing the proper gear, you stay warmer and have better traction, creating a more tolerable winter walk. Dress in layers. Long underwear or layered shirts and leggings can be put underneath normal clothes to keep heat in. Heavy-duty winter coats are a must. Although they’re not the most attractive, insulated overalls are especially helpful for keeping you warm in frigid temperatures.

Wednesday, December 20, 2017

Marijuana/Heart

In 28 states in this country, you can legally use marijuana for a range of health problems, including chronic pain, anxiety, and nausea. Smoking is the fastest way to feel the effects of marijuana, which is derived from the Cannabis sativa plant. Yet marijuana smoke contains many of the same toxins, irritants, and carcinogens found in cigarette smoke — a known contributor to heart disease as well as cancer.
Marijuana cultivation and use dates back some 6,000 years. However, the cardiovascular and other health effects of cannabis aren't well studied. That's partly because under federal law, cannabis is a Schedule I substance, meaning it has "no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse." That designation places numerous restrictions on researchers, making it difficult to carry out rigorous research on marijuana.
"As a result, everything we're told about what marijuana does or doesn't do should be viewed with a certain amount of caution. This holds equally true for the risks as well as the benefits," says Dr. Kenneth Mukamal, associate professor of medicine at Harvard-affiliated Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

Pot and pain

Some of the strongest evidence supporting the medical use of marijuana is for managing chronic pain. Cannabinoid compounds (see "Cannabis 101") interact with receptors in nerve cells to slow down pain impulses and ease discomfort. Cannabinoids also have been shown to be effective in quelling nausea and vomiting. In addition, marijuana is a powerful appetite inducer. The combination of these attributes makes marijuana a therapeutic option for people coping with the side effects of chemotherapy and others who are in danger of unintended weight loss. However, in conditions where gaining extra weight might exacerbate existing health problems, such as diabetes, appetite stimulation would be counterproductive.

Cardiovascular effects

One of the few things scientists know for sure about marijuana and cardiovascular health is that people with established heart disease who are under stress develop chest pain more quickly if they have been smoking marijuana than they would have otherwise. This is because of complex effects cannabinoids have on the cardiovascular system, including raising resting heart rate, dilating blood vessels, and making the heart pump harder. Research suggests that the risk of heart attack is several times higher in the hour after smoking marijuana than it would be normally. While this does not pose a significant threat to people who have minimal cardiovascular risk, it should be a red flag for anyone with a history of heart disease. Although the evidence is weaker, there are also links to a higher risk of atrial fibrillation or ischemic stroke immediately following marijuana use. Consistent with these links, studies by Dr. Mukamal and colleagues also suggest that marijuana smoking may increase the long-term death rate among heart attack survivors.

Questions remain

Most of the evidence linking marijuana to heart attack and stroke is based on reports from people who smoked it. So it's hard to separate the effects of cannabinoid compounds on the cardiovascular system from the hazards posed by the irritants and carcinogens contained in the smoke. Because cannabis smoke is known to cause airway inflammation, wheezing, and chest tightness, people with lung diseases should not smoke it. Other people who should just say no to marijuana include those who may be vulnerable to developing schizophrenia or addiction.

RED Cross first aid

Before administering care to an ill or injured person, check the scene and the person. Size up the scene and form an initial impression.
Pause and looks at the scene and the person before responding. Answer the following questions:
- Is the scene safe to enter?
- What happened?
- How many people are involved?
- What is my initial impression about the nature of the person’s illness or injury? Does the person have any life-threatening conditions, such as severe, life-threatening bleeding?
- Is anyone else available to help?

2If the Person is awake and Responsive and there is no severe life-threatening bleeding:
- Obtain consent: Tell the person your name, describes type and level of training, states what you thinks is wrong and what you plans to do, and asks permission to provide care.
- Tell a bystander to get the AED and first aid kit: Point to a bystander and speak out loud.
- Use appropriate PPE: Put on gloves, if available.
- Interview the person: Uses SAMPLE questions to gather more information about signs and symptoms, allergies, medications, pertinent medical history, last food or drink and events leading up to the incident.
- Conduct a head-to-toe check: Check head and neck, shoulders, chest and abdomen, hips, legs and feet, arms and hands for signs of injury.
- Provide care consistent with knowledge and training according to the conditions you find.

3If the Person Appears Unresponsive:
Shout to get the person’s attention, using the person’s name if it is known. If there is no response, tap the person’s shoulder (if the person is an adult or child) or the bottom of the person’s foot (if the person is an infant) and shout again, while checking for normal breathing. Check for Responsiveness and breathing for no more than 5-10 seconds.

4If the person is breathing:
- Send someone to call 911 or the designated emergency number and obtain an AED and first aid kit.
- Proceed with gathering information from bystanders using the SAMPLE questions 
- Conduct a head-to-toe check.
- Roll the person onto his or her side into a recovery position if there are no obvious signs of injury.

5If the person is NOT breathing:
- Send someone to call 911 or the designated emergency number and obtain an AED and first aid kit.
- Ensure that the person is face-up on a firm, flat surface such as the floor or ground.
- Begin CPR (starting with compressions) or use an AED if one is immediately available, if you are trained in giving CPR and using an AED.
- Continue administering CPR until the person exhibits signs of life, such as breathing, an AED becomes available, or EMS or trained medical responders arrive on scene.
Note: End CPR if the scene becomes unsafe or you cannot continue due to exhaustion.

Additional Information

To see the steps to perform first aid and learn how to administer care properly, watch our videos:
You can also sign up for a get First Aid/CPR/AED certified, where you'll learn the latest techniques and earn a two-year certification in first aid from the American Red Cross.

Tuesday, December 19, 2017

Xmas tree safety

1) When choosing a tree, look for one that is fresh and has green needles that don't fall out. Brownish needles mean the tree is dried out and more prone to catch fire.
2) Water your tree daily to prevent it from drying out.
3) Check the manufacturer's labels to ensure you use only lights and decorations that are flame-retardant. Look for a nationally recognized testing laboratory, such as Underwriters Laboratories, Intertek or the Canadian Standards Association, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission.
4) Check holiday lights for frayed wires or excessive wear.
5) Don't connect more than three strands of mini-string sets and a maximum of 50 bulbs for screw-in bulbs.
6) Keep your tree at least 3 feet away from any heat source, such as a fireplace, radiator, candles or lights.
7) Make sure your tree is not blocking an exit. In case there is a fire, you want a way to get out.
8) Always turn off lights on a tree before going to bed or leaving your home.
9) Get rid of a tree when its needles start dropping. It means the tree is drying out.
10) Check that your smoke alarm is working properly.

Monday, December 18, 2017

10 Tips to Stay Healthy During the Winter Season

  1. Drink the optimal amount of water. With the winter season here, it’s more important than ever to consume the right amount of water for your health.
  2. Keep stress to a minimum. Studies have linked high stress levels to making a person more susceptible to catching colds and flu. Minimize your stress by working reasonable hours at your job. Aim for at least one night per week to spend with friends and family. If your stress is out of hand and you feel like you need some help, let me know. Frequently, I work with people who have stress or emotional challenges and utilize Bach Flower Remedies to bring their emotional health back into balance.
  3. Eat a healthy diet. Maintaining a good healthy diet full of fresh fruits and vegetables and minimal amounts of organic meats is another way to keep your body clean and in good working order. Try eating an extra piece of fruit or veggie every day too!
  4. Do your homework to find the best supplement for your health. Even if you eat “perfectly” all the time with loads of fresh fruits and vegetables, you still need to boost your nutrition with a supplement. What supplements you will need will depend significantly on your lifestyle. If you’re not sure whether you need them at all, read this post on why we need supplements. Let me help you choose the best supplement program for your lifestyle. Some supplements I recommend taking during the winter season include:
    • Essential Oils. Essential Oils are a must-have to protect yourself and help your immune system. There are a variety of essential oils that have been found to be highly effective against airborne bacteria. They also can do a lot to strengthen your body, boost your immune system and help you to overcome colds and flu.
    • Standard Process Products: There are several products in the Standard Process / Medi-Herb line that I recommend during this time of year. Your unique health situation determines which one would be appropriate for you. Contact me to discuss which product might be best for you.
  5. Exercise regularly. It is important to exercise regularly, even if only for 15 minutes a day! Get out and take a short walk and enjoy the cooler weather.
  6. Get the right amount of sleep every night. The average person needs 6-8 hours of sleep per night. If you’re not getting enough sleep, your body is extremely vulnerable to illness. Sleep is very much like fuel that recharges your batteries! You’ve got to do it to keep the machine running.
  7. Wash your hands regularly. Keep the bacteria and viruses off your hands and out of your mouth and eyes. Keep a bottle of hand sanitizer close-by for those instances where you can’t get to soap and water.
  8. Don’t smoke. Most of you already know this, but it bears repeating because smoking significantly weakens your immune system. If you want to quit and have tried everything else, let me know. I have some nutritional recommendations that can help you quit!
  9. Eliminate all forms of sugar. This includes not only the obvious kinds (cake, cookies and sweets, in general), but bread, pasta, rice, yogurt and commercial, store-bought fruit juices. Although all of these things are made with different types of sugars, your body still converts them to sugar, which will compromise your immune system.
  10. Despite your best efforts, you still can feel like you’re “coming down with something.” Some things you can do to help your body recover more quickly:
    • Eliminate all dairy products.
    • Eliminate all alcohol.
    • Eliminate all grains (bread, rice, pasta, etc.).
    • Boost your Vitamin C (with bioflavanoids) intake when you initially feel something coming on.
    • Boost your intake of Zinc.
    • Increase water consumption (even more than normal!).
    • Eat less food as this will give your body a much needed rest from digestion and give it a chance to concentrate on fighting off potential invaders.
    • Add herbs like Echinacea, Goldenseal and Grapefruit Seed Extract to your supplemental regime.
    • Get more rest than normal. If you normally get 6 hours of sleep a night, try increasing it to 7 or 8.
    • Increase the recommended supplementation above.

Enjoy a Safe Holiday Season

Enjoy a Safe Holiday Season


  • Holiday safety is an issue that burns brightest from late November to mid-January, when families gather, parties are scheduled and travel spikes. Take some basic precautions to ensure your family remains safe and injury-free throughout the season.

    Traveling for the Holidays? Be Prepared


    Many people choose to travel during the holidays by automobile, with the highest fatality rate of any major form of transportation. In 2015, 355 people died on New Year's Day, 386 on Thanksgiving Day and 273 on Christmas Day, according to Injury Facts 2017. Alcohol-impaired fatalities represent about one-third of the totals.

    Even Angel Hair can Hurt

    Decorating is one of the best ways to get in a holiday mood, but emergency rooms see thousands of injuries involving holiday decorating every season.
    • "Angel hair," made from spun glass, can irritate your eyes and skin; always wear gloves or substitute non-flammable cotton
    • Spraying artificial snow can irritate your lungs if inhaled; follow directions carefully
    • Decorate the tree with your kids in mind; move ornaments that are breakable or have metal hooks toward the top
    • Always use the proper step ladder; don't stand on chairs or other furniture
    • Lights are among the best parts of holiday decorating; make sure there are no exposed or frayed wires, loose connections or broken sockets, and don't overload your electrical circuits
    • Plants can spruce up your holiday decorating, but keep those that may be poisonous (including some Poinsettias) out of reach of children or pets; the national Poison Control Center can be reached at (800) 222-1222
    • Make sure paths are clear so no one trips on wrapping paper, decorations, toys, etc.; NSC provides tips for older adults on slip, trip and fall protection

    It's Better to Give ... Safely

     

    We've all heard it's important when choosing toys for infants or small children to avoid small parts that might prove to be a choking hazard. Here are some additional gift-related safety tips:

    Watch Out for Those Fire-starters


    Candles and Fireplaces


    Thousands of deaths are caused by fires, burns and other fire-related injuries every year, and 12% of home candle fires occur in December, the National Fire Protection Association reports. Increased use of candles and fireplaces, combined with an increase in the amount of combustible, seasonal decorations present in many homes means more risk for fire.
    • Never leave burning candles unattended or sleep in a room with a lit candle
    • Keep candles out of reach of children
    • Make sure candles are on stable surfaces
    • Don't burn candles near trees, curtains or any other flammable items
    • Don't burn trees, wreaths or wrapping paper in the fireplace
    • Check and clean the chimney and fireplace area at least once a year

    Turkey Fryers

    While many subscribe to the theory any fried food is good – even if it's not necessarily good for you – there is reason to be on alert if you're thinking of celebrating the holidays by frying a turkey.
    The Consumer Product Safety Commission reports there have been 168 turkey-fryer related fires, burns, explosions or carbon monoxide poisoning incidents since 2002. CPSC says 672 people have been injured and $8 million in property damage losseshave resulted from these incidents.
    NSC discourages the use of turkey fryers at home and urges those who prefer fried turkey to seek out professional establishments or consider a new oil-less turkey fryer.

    Don't Give the Gift of Food Poisoning


    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services provides some holiday food safety tips. Here are a few:
    • Do not rinse raw meat and poultry before cooking
    • Use a food thermometer to make sure meat is cooked to a safe temperature
    • Refrigerate food within two hours
    • Thanksgiving leftovers are safe for four days in the refrigerator
    • Bring sauces, soups and gravies to a rolling boil when reheating
    • When storing turkey, cut the leftovers in small pieces so they will chill quickly
    • Wash your hands frequently when handling food

Picking the tree

Picking the tree
  • Choose a tree with fresh, green needles that do not fall off when touched.
Placing the tree
  • Before placing the tree in the stand, cut 2" from the base of the trunk.
  • Make sure the tree is at least three feet away from any heat source, like fireplaces, radiators, candles, heat vents or lights.
  • Make sure the tree is not blocking an exit.
  • Add water to the tree stand. Be sure to add water daily.
Lighting the tree
  • Use lights that have the label of an independent testing laboratory. Some lights are only for indoor or outdoor use.
  • Replace any string of lights with worn or broken cords or loose bulb connections. Read manufacturer's instructions for number of light strands to connect. 
  • Never use lit candles to decorate the tree.
  • Always turn off Christmas tree lights before leaving home or going to bed.
After Christmas
  • Get rid of the tree after Christmas. Dried-out trees are a fire danger and should not be left in the home or garage, or placed outside against the home. Check with your local community to find a recycling program. Bring outdoor electrical lights inside after the holidays to prevent hazards and make them last longer.

Saturday, December 16, 2017

As temperatures drop this winter

As temperatures drop this winter, the American Red Cross offers ten steps people can take to stay safe during the cold weather.
1. Layer up! Wear layers of lightweight clothing to stay warm. Gloves and a hat will help prevent losing your body heat.
2. Don’t forget your furry friends. Bring pets indoors. If they can’t come inside, make sure they have enough shelter to keep them warm and that they can get to unfrozen water.
3. Remember the three feet rule. If you are using a space heater, place it on a level, hard surface and keep anything flammable at least three feet away – things such as paper, clothing, bedding, curtains or rugs.
4. Requires supervision – Turn off space heaters and make sure fireplace embers are out before leaving the room or going to bed.
5. Don’t catch fire! If you are using a fireplace, use a glass or metal fire screen large enough to catch sparks and rolling logs.
6. Protect your pipes. Run water, even at a trickle, to help prevent your pipes from freezing. Open the kitchen and bathroom cabinet doors to allow warmer air to circulate around the plumbing. Be sure to move any harmful cleaners and household chemicals out of the reach of children. Keep the garage doors closed if there are water lines in the garage.
7. Better safe than sorry. Keep the thermostat at the same temperature day and night. Your heating bill may be a little higher, but you could avoid a more costly repair job if your pipes freeze and burst.
8. The kitchen is for cooking. Never use a stove or oven to heat your home.
9. Use generators outside. Never operate a generator inside the home, including in the basement or garage.
10. Knowledge is power. Don’t hook a generator up to the home’s wiring. The safest thing to do is to connect the equipment you want to power directly to the outlets on the generator.
For more information on how to stay safe during the cold weather, visit winter storm safety.

Friday, December 15, 2017

Winter is a time when household fires occur. It is a good time to remember to

Fire Protection

Winter is a time when household fires occur. It is a good time to remember to:
  • Buy and install smoke alarms on every floor of your home
  • Test smoke alarms monthly
  • Practice fire drills with your children
  • Install a carbon monoxide detector outside bedrooms
  • Keep space heaters at least 3 feet away from anything that could burn, and turn them off when leaving the room or sleeping.
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